Category Archives: Muskegon Area Gamers

Twilight Imperium Strategy Guide Preview

[Editor’s note: Dusty has been working on a complete strategy guide for Twilight Imperium 4. His thoughts on the game carry considerable weight since he is the winningest player of TI3 in our group. While he promises his full strategy guide is currently in development, we can get a taste of what’s coming from the following preview…]

Twilight Imperium Strategy Guide Preview

Preview 1: Should you score a public objective on round 1?

Muskegon loves Twilight Imperium 4th Edition
Twilight Imperium 4th Edition from Fantasy Flight Games

I believe most players agree that the best way to win Twilight Imperium is to heavily focus on scoring objectives, basically at all times.

On round 1, however, I believe you are better off focusing on military, expansion, or a race specific strategy. This is because by and large scoring a victory point on round 1 will stunt your growth in these fundamental areas.

Here are the 10 possible stage 1 objectives:

“Erect a Monument – Spend 8 resources”

This has to be the most difficult objective to justify scoring on the first turn. Scoring this objective means you wont be doing much else. Probably no technology and few, if any, additional units will be purchasd.

I’m hard-pressed to imagine a legitimate strategy that includes scoring this on round 1.

“Sway the council – Spend 8 influence”

About the only time I could see scoring this on turn 1 making sense is if you have a couple of influence heavy planets adjacent to your homeworld and you are able to use diplomacy effectively. Even then, my hunch is that you would be better off using diplomacy to access additional resources or using that influence to purchase command counters.

“Found research outposts – Control 3 planets that have technology specialties”

It probably makes sense to score this turn 1 if you can. That being said, it’s probably not practical.

First off, the chances that there are three tech specialty planets in range is extremely low.

Second, all 8 of the technology specialties are in different systems. That means that everyone but the XXcha will require 3 carriers to accomplish this on the first turn. That is a tall order.

Third, even if you could do this on turn 1, it likely would stunt your growth relative to other moves you could make. All of the technology specialty planets are low resource planets (all of them have a 0 or 1 resource value).

“Negociate Trade Routes – Spend 5 Trade Goods”

This is not too difficult for the person with the trade strategy card to score. However, it means you are spending 5 resources on turn 1 to score a victory point instead of using those resources to build your fleet or technology infrastructure.

“Intimidate the Council – Have 1 or more ships in 2 systems that are adjacent to Mexatol Rex’s system”

This is doable on turn 1 in the right circumstances. However, it probably stunts your growth to do so. I believe this requires you to have gravity drive and to spend a command counter on turn 1 that is not capturing planets or building. This means unless you have the leadership strategy card, its very unlikely you are going to expand to two systems and build in your home system (which is probably the most typical start).

Even with the potential stunt to growth, this is one of the first objectives where scoring it later could become significantly more difficult. If you can get this out of the way turn 1, it could save you the headache of having to jockey for position in later rounds.

“Expand borders – Control 6 planets in non-home systems”

If you can score this round 1, you should. The chances that you have 6 planets in range and have access to three carriers is practically zero though.

“Diversify Research – Own 2 technologies in each of 2 colors”

Scoring this turn 1 is a pain for everyone except the Jol-nar. There are 6 races that start with two technologies. Theoretically any of them score this turn 1 with the Technology strategy card. Should they? Probably not. The only way it might make sense is if those two technology purchases play into a specific strategy, otherwise spending 6 resources turn 1 is going to stunt your growth.

“Corner the Market – Control 4 planets that each have the same planet trait”

This has to be one of the best objectives to score on turn 1. Of course, most times it won’t be possible. This objective is one of the most important to pay attention to during galaxy setup. If you can make it so that this objective is scoreable on turn 1, it will be a big boost.

“Develop Weaponry – Own 2 unit upgrade technologies”

This is practically impossible for everyone but the Jol-nar to score turn 1. Frankly, most races will have difficulty scoring this on turn 2 as well.

“Lead from the front – Spend a total of 3 tokens from your tactic and or strategy pool.”

This is the easiest and worst objective to score round 1. If you do not have leadership and you choose to score this round 1 you are going to be handicapped during the entire early game. I have a hard time believing there is a coherent strategy that involves scoring this turn 1 – if you win after doing so, I think most of the time it will be despite scoring this turn 1, not because of it.

 

Arborec Early Game Strategy – Sarween Seed

Arborec (TI4)
Arborec (TI4)

Twilight Imperium early game strategies are difficult to develop because there are a lot of variables (galaxy setup, neighbor races, starting public objectives, trade metagame, strategy card, etc.). However, I believe they are useful because they can highlight how powerful a particular race can be in the right circumstances.

Here is my early game strategy for the Arborec, I call it the Sarween Seed.

Galaxy Setup

Galaxy setup is basic general strategy.

Strategy Card

Warfare.

This strategy starts with the Arborec selecting the Warfare strategy card. In my view, Warfare is the best strategy card for the Arborec generally because it allows them to expand quickly, either spreading out to take over a massive amount of territory, or amassing a huge ground force to take and hold Mecatol Rex.

It is essential for this particular strategy.

Turn 1
Move carrier, 4 infantry to adjacent system. Take control of planets. For this to work you need one of those planets to be worth 1 resource. Preferably you want high influence planets.

Exhaust home system to build second carrier in that system.

Diplomacy Secondary
You need the diplomacy secondary to trigger after turn 1 and before Technology. This shouldn’t be too out of the ordinary because most players with Diplomacy strategy card will take a system round 1 then use Diplomacy to refresh those planets turn 2 so they are available for them to use during a Warfare or Technology secondary.

Refresh your homeworld and a 1 resource planet.

Turn 2
Warfare Primary – pick up command counter from turn 1 unlocking your two carriers and 4 ground forces for additional expansion opportunities.

Technology Secondary
You need the technology secondary to trigger before turn 3 and after diplomacy.

During the technology secondary, purchase Sarween Tools.

Turn 3

Move one carrier and 2 ground forces to take over planets in an adjacent system. Use the one free resource from Sarween Tools to build 2 ground forces.

Turn 4

Move one carrier and 2 ground forces to take over planets in an adjacent system. Use the one free resource from Sarween Tools to build 2 ground forces.

At this point, your command counter configuration is 1/3/0 and you are ready to pass. This provides a great setup going into round 2. You will be in a good position to expand further and/or take over Mecatol Rex with a sizeable ground force (assuming you have the influence).

You could potentially increase the potency of this strategy with trade.

 

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Hits & Flops October 2017

I’ve been able to get several new games under my belt since our last installment of Hits & Flops. Dusty has been buying lots of games in 2017. In addition, Brian has been introducing us to lots of games. And of course I buy games like they are going out of style. Let’s have some fun with another installment of Hits & Flops.

Board Game Hits & Flops October 2017

 

Quartermaster General 1914

Quartermaster General 1914
Quartermaster General 1914

About a year ago, Bruce brought over a nifty little World War II game called Quartermaster General. Each player takes on one of the belligerents: three play the Axis and three play the Allies. On your turn, you play a card such as “Build Army” or “Sea Battle”. Once you play the card, it goes in your discard pile, never to return to play. You score points by owning victory cities at the end of each of your turns. Which every team has the most points at the end of the game is winner.

Quartermaster General 1914 in action
Quartermaster General 1914 in action

There are some cards that mill cards off your opponent’s deck. These cards are called Economic Warfare cards. It’s quite possible for someone to run out of cards before the end of the game. Some card are “Status Cards” and they stay in play, giving you a permanent bonus. And some cards are “Event Cards” that have a powerful one time effect.

Bruce’s WWII game went over quite well. Its simplicity was charming. The team interaction was fun. And all our games of it were intense. So when I saw they were releasing  WWI version I was understandably intrigued.

Rules reference QMG 1914
Rules reference QMG 1914

The new version, called Quartermaster General 1914, is largely the same as the aforementioned WWII game. The major differences are: theme (this one is WWI) and complexity. This new version cranks up the complexity by a fair margin. I thought our group might like this expert take on a game we love. I took a chance and bought it.

1914 is very asymmetrical. All of the QMG games are asymmetrical. But 1914 is particularly so. There are 5 powers in the game. The Central Powers have 2 players whereas the Triple Entente has 3 players. So the Triple Entente have to use their superior numbers to hammer Germany and Austria-Hungary into submission.

The British get a toehold on the continent
The British get a toehold on the continent

Some of the powers have more than one country at their command. Austria-Hungary command Austria-Hungary and the Ottomans. The British control the US. And France controls Italy. So your deck of cards may have some cards that refer to one power but not the other.

This version also allows players to prepare a card in addition to playing a card. Prepared cards use icons on them instead of the text. This gives all cards multi uses–one of my favorite game mechanics.

With all the extra complexity, I waited until a Tuesday to spring it on our regulars. The game went over very well. I loved it. It could become my favorite game in the growing QMG series (there is also a Peloponnesian War game).

Verdict: Hit!

 

Immortals

Immortals from Queen Games
Immortals from Queen Games

Wallenstein is a great game. It’s a Euro-war game with a cube tower instead of dice. Your armies are wooden cubes. When you fight, you drop your cubes and your opponent’s cubes into the cube tower. Some cubes will fall out and others will not. Your cubes that fall out are compared to your opponent’s that fall out. The difference are placed in the territory.

The novel combat system of Wallenstein has been adopted by other games. The combat system in End of the Triumvirate is similar. And the deduction mechanic of Mord im Arosa is not dissimilar. So when designers Mike Elliot and Dirk Henn announced a fantasy version, the gaming world took note.

Components of The Immortals
Components of The Immortals

Dusty was one of the gamers who took note. He taught Nick Sima and myself how to play a couple of Sundays ago.

And it went over like a lead balloon.

Unlike the added complexity Quartermaster General 1914 affords over its predecessors, the added complexity in The Immortals is unneeded and unwanted.

There are now two resources instead of just money. There is a divided game board: one for evil races and one for good races. And everyone controls exactly one of each. You can move between the two planes of existence if you build a portal.

Board for The Immortals
Board for The Immortals

The game board is busy. And the graphic design is less than ideal. The theme also does not shine through as much as it does in Wallenstein.

The Immortals isn’t a terrible game. It’s just an unneeded game. Wallenstein (or its Japanese themed counterpart, Shogun) are good enough.

Verdict: Flop.

 

Apocrypha

Apocrypha Adventure Game
Apocrypha Adventure Game

Apocrypha Adventure Card Game was made for people who like Pathfinder the Card Game. It’s a campaign style coop where players build a deck with certain advantages and disadvantages in an effort to defeat an AI.

Pathfinder was not my cup of tea. The idea of a campaign or legacy card game is interesting enough. But the mechanics in Pathfinder are not interesting. They are a convoluted version of Battle of Greyport–a game that is quite fun once in a while but not enough to play an entire campaign.

Dice and standees for Apocrypha
Dice and standees for Apocrypha

Our first play of Apocrypha was marred by our utter ignorance of the rules. The publisher has a how-to video. We thought we could slog our way through the game. We were wrong. After almost 2 hours, we decided to abandon our game.

Even if I knew the rules well and could play a complete game, Apocrypha just isn’t my type of game. The trick to Apocrypha isn’t trying to play  your whole hand of cards. It’s trying to use your one time use cards to maximum ability. So if you were thinking this was Dominion, you would be disappointed. But if you like Mage Knight, you might like this.

Verdict: Flop.

 

Magic Maze

Magic Maze from Gyom
Magic Maze from Gyom

Dusty introduce Jon and myself to Magic Maze a few weeks ago. Jon, who’s a theme junkie, was warned by Dusty this game would probably not be his cup of tea.

In Magic Maze, players do not control one of the adventurers. Instead, they control a certain movement direction. So anyone can move the barbarian but only one person can move him north. Players work together to move the elf, dwarf, wizard and barbarian through a shopping mall to get all the adventuring equipment they need. The game has an hourglass so players have only so long to do so.

Play through of Magic Maze
Play through of Magic Maze

Despite its weak theme, Jon liked the game. And so do I. Magic Maze could become my favorite filler. This little rascal plays in 15 minutes and offers 17 increasingly difficult scenarios.

We introduced this game to our Thursday night group as well. And it was roundly appreciated. Magic Maze is so good, it’s difficult to imagine a game collection without it. It’s good for hardcore gamers. It’s good for non-gamers. It’s fun with kids. Designer Kasper Lapp really struck gold with this one.

Verdict: HIT!

 

Century Road Spice

Century: Golem Edition
Century: Golem Edition

Steve and his wife had us over for games a few weeks ago. They taught us Century: Golem Edition. This is a reimplementation of Century: Spice Road. It’s not yet available for retail. Steve was able to get a copy at GenCon.

Players are competing to build golems in this fantasy card game. You first must acquire all the gems needed to build a golem. This is done by playing cards from your hand that either give you gems or that let you exchange gems for different gems.

Gems and cards from Century Golem
Gems and cards from Century Golem

Players have a hand of cards. They can either play a card from their hand, refresh their hand of cards, draft a card from the board or spend gems to buy a golem. You win the game by scoring points, mostly from building golems.

My wife adored the game. She said the game was very relaxing. Probably because we just played Magic Maze, a frenzied timed game. But she is right that Century is a good game. It is light enough to teach non-gamers. It could also be a good cool down game for hardcore gamers.

Verdict: HIT!

 

Stop Thief!

Stop Thief! from Restoration Games
Stop Thief! from Restoration Games

I’ve found a copy of the classic Parker Brother’s game, Stop Thief! recently. It was the second such copy that I’ve found at thrift stores in 2017. This is a nifty old game where you have an electronic device that makes sounds, giving you clues where the thief is at.

Rob Daviau has launched a company who’s goal is to make modern versions of these old games. This is one of the first games he’s restored. The electronic device is now your smartphone’s app. The artwork is updated. But the feel of the game is the same.

Game board and pawns in Stop Thief!
Game board and pawns in Stop Thief!

Because of the smartphone app, the sound quality is way better than it was in the 1979 version. When the thief moves to a door, you hear a creaky old door open. When the thief moves outside, you hear the hustle and bustle of a busy street.

The roll-and-move has been replaced with a hand of cards. This is a huge improvement. One of the cards gives you a private tip but it usually moves you only a few spaces. When you play a card, you do not get it back until you play your refresh hand card.

The dragnet tightens
The dragnet tightens

Despite its obvious improvements, Stop Thief! hasn’t been a hit. We’ve been playing it on “difficult” or “intermediate” settings. The difficult setting makes the private tip feature all but useless. And the intermediate game makes the private tip weak. We also played with the no cash option. This was objectively bad. In fact, the only good way to play Stop Thief! is to play the easy game, the way the game was originally design. It’s a simple deduction game with some press-your-luck. It doesn’t need dozens of add-ons.

Verdict: Undetermined.

 

Where every game night is a hit

Muskegon Area Gamers

Muskegon, MI
196 Muskegon Area Gamers

This group is for anyone interested in playing board games, card games or any table top game. This group learns and teachs new games all the time. We welcome fresh players. We…

Next Meetup

Dictator Ben

Tuesday, Oct 10, 2017, 6:00 PM
2 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

 

 

September 2017 thrift store

It’s that time again. It’s time for our most followed column: my recent thrift store finds. I cast a wide net and rescue many endangered games. Below are the highlights from my recent endeavors. And as always, these games are available to any of our members.

 

Thrift Store Finds September 2017

 

Axis & Allies

Axis & Allies Guadalcanal
Axis & Allies Guadalcanal

Long time followers know about what Axis & Allies has meant to my gaming history. Axis & Allies is always an auto-buy when I find it at thrift stores. I can usually cobble together a full game from any thrift store find. And Axis & Allies is a great game to give to a local gamer who doesn’t know about our existence.

Axis & Allies D-Day
Axis & Allies D-Day

So you can imagine my excitement when I found not one, not two, not three but four copies of Axis & Allies! I was perusing the flea market and found Axis & Allies Guadalcanal and Axis & Allies D-Day. I found a copy of the revised edition at a local Goodwill. And I found Axis & Allies Pacific at another Goodwill.

Axis & Allies (revised)
Axis & Allies (revised)

Axis & Allies is the next step up from Risk. It’s a good gateway game to bring people into hobby. I would recommend it until your group graduates to 1754: Conquest or such.

 

Risk

Risk Legacy
Risk Legacy

Speaking of Risk, I find copies often at thrift stores. I usually just give them away to local gamers so they know about The Gaming Annex. But this past month was a marque month for finding Risk. I found not one but two copies of Risk: Legacy.

Risk Legacy city
Risk Legacy city

Risk: Legacy is the brainchild of Rob Daviau, the founder of Restoration Games. He is the architect of several legacy games with Risk: Legacy being the first.

The two copies I found had been played through, unfortunately. So I have lots of plastic army dudes!

Risk: Captain America Civil War
Risk: Captain America Civil War

Two different Risk games were available at Meijer: Star Wars and Captain America Civil War. Meijer struggled to sell these so they were put on clearance. Now the games are a bit harder to find.

I did manage to do just that. There was a $3 copy at a thrift store. It was opened but unplayed. I suppose someone was gifted this game and didn’t want it. I’m confident I can find a local person who wants this 🙂

Risk: Plants vs. Zombies
Risk: Plants vs. Zombies

Last but not least I found Risk: Plants vs. Zombies. Indeed I found two copies this month. One game was short on pieces. I thought since I found two copies I could cobble together a full game. I was able to. But there is an anomaly in publication. Some copies have gray zombies and others have purple zombies. I’m not sure why this happened. But if you need pieces to complete a copy, be warned about this!

Codenames

Codenames from Czech Games
Codenames from Czech Games

Codenames is a very popular game from a very esteemed designer. Codenames is ranked #1 on BGG for party games and #36 overall. It was designed by Vlaada Chvátil. He has four games on the Top 100 of BGG. No other designer is even close with the possible caveat of Uwe Rosenberg.

I found a neglected copy of Codenames at the Goodwill on Norton and Henry recently. The game was complete and appeared to be unplayed.

I found a home for this game recently so this game is no longer available. But don’t fret. You can get new copies for very cheap at Out of the Box or online.

 

Assassin’s Creed

Assassin's Creed
Assassin’s Creed

Board games that use video game IP’s, movie IP’s or TV show IP’s  usually are not good. This has not stopped Cryptozoic Games from trying, though. They have published Adventure Time, Archer, Attack on Titan and Batman: Arkham City.

Due to the IP’s draw, I usually pick up Cryptozoic Games from thrift stores. Their low BGG’s rating are often ignored by new gamers. And newer gamers are the ones I’m trying to reach. Even Assassin’s Creed holds a modest 5.7 on BGG.

 

Stop Thief!

Stop Thief! from MB
Stop Thief! from MB

I was flabbergasted when I found a copy of Parker Brother’s Stop Thief back in March/April. This game has been on my Holy Grail list for, well, all my life. The game is a detective/deduction game that is far superior to Clue.

Thrift Store Finds: March 2017
Stop Thief! board and detectives

This cute game comes with an electronic device that makes sounds. Based upon the sound, you can deduce where the thief is. If you figure out where he is at, you get paid. Collect enough money and you win.

I was flabbergasted for the second time this year when I found Stop Thief! again! So if you need a copy, hit me up!

 

Other Notable Games

Lionheart from Parker Brothers
Lionheart from Parker Brothers
Guillotine from Wizards of the Coast
Guillotine from Wizards of the Coast
Bandu from Milton Bradley
Bandu from Milton Bradley
Simpon's Chess Set
Simpon’s Chess Set

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where thrift store games are loved…

Muskegon Area Gamers

Muskegon, MI
195 Muskegon Area Gamers

This group is for anyone interested in playing board games, card games or any table top game. This group learns and teachs new games all the time. We welcome fresh players. We…

Next Meetup

Dictator Make Up Day

Tuesday, Oct 3, 2017, 6:00 PM
5 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

 

 

 

 

RPG or Board Game? Who’s to decide?

[Editor’s note: long time contributor Nick Sima has become rather enamored by the world of Terrinoth. With Fantasy Flight’s recent announcements about Runewars Miniatures Game and the new Legacy of Dragonholt, Nick’s become inspired to write about it. This will be the first in an ongoing column about Terrinoth…]

 

RPG or Board Game? Who’s to decide?

Legacy of Dragonholt
Legacy of Dragonholt

Just before Gen Con (yes, that Gen Con) there were a few announcements made by Fantasy Flight. I was all excited for what they’d drop on us and checked a couple days prior to find a little game called Legacy of Dragonholt. It’s set in the ever expanding Runebound universe and features the brand new Oracle system.

Oracle System
Oracle System

The Oracle system appears to be very much like a choose your adventure book. I’m thinking it’s akin to Tales of the Arabian Nights, but who knows? Fantasy Flight has given it no press since the initial release. As of this posting, it still reads as ‘At the Printer’ on FFG’s site. Maybe they don’t want to reveal too much of their Oracle system before the product launches.

Muskegon loves Runewars
Runewars Miniatures Game from Fantasy Flight Games

I am still quite excited at the prospect of this new game. I find the Runebound universe extremely exciting and want to see more things created in that space. My plan is to write a series of blog posts about the history of Runebound and how we got to this new and exciting game, and I’ve been doing a bit of research to get that off the ground.

Legacy of Dragonholt box
Legacy of Dragonholt box

In that research, I found that BGG put Legacy of Dragonholt in the RPGGeek side. There’s currently a back and forth (as BGG users are so wont to do) about the precedent of it being a Board game or RPG. As you’d expect there’s a lot of anecdotal evidence and conjecture, so if you’re interested in that sort of thing, check it out.

Legacy of Dragonholt is on the pending approval page for board game listings a few times now, so hopefully BGG gets its act together and puts it where it (probably) belongs.

 

If you’d like to play Battlelore or Runewars with Nick Sima or any other member of the Muskegon Area Gamers, visit us here…

 

 

SeaFall Session 4

SeaFall - Game 04

WARNING: SPOILERS!!! BOX 3 REVILED

We got another game played yesterday (1/19/2017). Took us around 2:40 to get the game fully played, a few mistakes were made (mainly on my behalf but were caught and fixed), and I lost big time. The game wasn’t nearly as close as it was on Game #3, this one had a clear winner, and a clear loser (me).

I tried to get two milestones, and a colony, due to a mistake I wasn’t able to get the first and Chris in that very same round snagged it from me, and that made it so I wouldn’t be able to get the second (Chris took it the next round), so I tried to go for a colony to set myself up for the next game, only to have Chris once again screw up my plans by ‘accidentally’ finding the Tomb of the Ancients (still a Cthulhu theme!) and ending the game. He deserves it, being last in most of the games, and overall, until that point.


Outcome

Brian – 26

  • Buildings
    • Trading Port
  • Upgrades
    • Stalwart
  • Raids = 0
    • Failed Raids = 0
  • Explorations = 0
    • Failed Explorations = 0
  • Ships Sunk = 0
    • Total Damage taken = 0
  • Island Searches = 0
    • Failed = 0
  • Uncharted Water Cards = 0
  • Treasures = 0
  • Research = 0
  • Advisors = 0
  • Colonies = 0
  • Milestones

Tasha – 46

  • Buildings
    • Gun Tower
  • Upgrades
    • Hale
    • Nimble
  • Raids = 4
    • Failed Raids = 0
  • Explorations = 1
    • Failed Explorations = 1
  • Ships Sunk = 1
    • Total Damage taken = 5
  • Island Searches = 0
    • Failed = 0
  • Uncharted Water Cards = 3
  • Treasures = 6
  • Research = 0
  • Advisors = 3
  • Colonies – 0
  • Milestones
Chris – 35

  • Buildings
    • Gun Tower
  • Upgrades
    • Intrepid
  • Raids = 0
    • Failed Raids = 0
  • Explorations = 1
    • Failed Explorations = 0
  • Ships Sunk = 0
    • Total Damage taken = 3
  • Island Searches = 0
    • Failed = 0
  • Uncharted Water Cards = 0
  • Treasures = 1
  • Research = 0
  • Research = 0
  • Advisors = 3
  • Colonies = 0
  • Milestones
    • The Markets Tremble
    • Gold Beyond Measure
    • Ancient Secrets Unearthed
Brandi – 38

  • Buildings
  • Upgrades
    • Intrepid
    • Enduring
  • Raids = 0
    • Failed Raids = 0
  • Explorations = 1
    • Failed Explorations = 0
  • Ships Sunk = 0
    • Total Damage taken = 2
  • Island Searches = 1
    • Failed = 0
  • Uncharted Water Cards = 3
  • Treasures = 0
  • Research = 3
  • Advisors = 2
  • Colonies = 0
  • Milestones

Game Notes

SeaFall - Game 04This was an interesting game. I picked up the Trading Port allowing you to sell goods at +4, so 10 each, and had two people take me up on the offer to use it for one of their reputation tokens. Selling goods at 10 each is very handy, and helped Chris take ‘The Markets Tremble’ milestone (sell goods worth 30+ in one turn), then take the ‘Gold Beyond Measure’ milestone (Have 60+ gold in your vault).

That, however, made Tasha raid Chris’ vault later on and getting 19 of his gold.

Pirates attacked twice this time, attacking Tasha (person with the most gold), then attacking Chris (person with the most in their warehouse).

SeaFall - Game 04I was attacked by the ‘Sunken Ship’. In Game 3 (I think) Tasha sunk Brandi’s ship after Brandi attacked Tasha’s port. That put an X on the map where her ship sank, and with it being right at the port, it causes some issues.

I was the closest to the X (by 1 space, but farthest away by a ruler). They all incorrectly ruled that it was by space, (it was by distance, not space), so it attacked me (secretly I do agree that it should be by space, but don’t tell them). Thankfully I didn’t take any damage.

Brandi discovered another island, I think that makes 3 for her now, and 0 for everyone else.

SeaFall - Game 04 SeaFall - Game 04 SeaFall - Game 04
SeaFall - Game 04 SeaFall - Game 04

New Box

SeaFall - Game 04Look at all the goodies in the new box! We have a nice thick deck of new cards (including curses), new event cards, new rules, upgrades, buildings, and tombs!

The only things we didn’t get in this box are more treasures and advisors (thankfully not more advisors). I could have done without more rules.

The next game should be interesting with tombs and curse cards (with both of those, I am leaning more and more to thinking that Chis is correct and it is going to be a Cthulhu game).

Till next time!

 

Originally published at Iggy Games. You can follow Iggy on facebook here. Iggy is a partner of the Muskegon Area Gamers. We are glad to have his enthusiasm and his commentary.

 


 

Thrift Store Finds July 2017

It’s been some time since I posted my thrift store finds. Don’t let this hiatus lull you into thinking I’ve abandoned my post at every Goodwill in the tri-county area. There have been several good finds along with a couple of amazing finds. And, as always, these games are available for our members or readers of this blog at The Gaming Annex.

Thrift Store Finds July 2017

Bermuda Triangle

Bermuda Triangle (1976)
Bermuda Triangle (1976)

I first learned about the Bermuda Triangle in 1977. Charles Berlitz, a renowned writer of the paranormal, authored a popular book about the infamous area of the Atlantic. His work spawned a creepy episode of  In Search Of with Leonard Nimoy.

In Search Of with Leonard Nimoy
In Search Of with Leonard Nimoy

Berlitz’s book did more than spawn a TV episode though. Milton Bradley released a pick-up and deliver game called Bermuda Triangle the year after Berlitz’s book. I’ve blogged about the game in my essay about the origins of Ameritrash. It’s been a game that I’ve wanted since my childhood.

And the Goodwill in Grandville delivered! (Figuratively. I mean, they didn’t drive the game to my house).

Players must move about the eastern Caribbean, picking up goods an delivering them. Players get paid for making deliveries (total cash determines the winner). However, there are clouds forming. The area bound by Miami, San Juan and Nassau is haunted by an amorphous black fog. It’s magnetic properties screw up your navigation and cause your ships to be lost.

There's a storm abrewin'
There’s a storm abrewin’

Each player has a complement of ships. These plastic ships have a magnet on them. When the storm passes near them, the ship can be picked up. This means the ship is lost and you will have to buy a new one.

The game is beautiful for a 1970’s game. And the components are fun. I like the idea that the magnetic storm simulates the magnetic anomalies that sailors have noted in the real Bermuda Triangle. Ultimately, the roll-and-move aspect sinks this game by today’s standards. Still, I’m glad I found a copy!

A Cache of Dungeons & Dragons Books

Someone's collection of D&D books
Someone’s collection of D&D books

Several weeks ago, a follower of ours on Facebook was looking to sell some D&D books. She asked if I would post her wares on our page. I obliged. The post drew a tremendous amount of interest from the Muskegon area. Seems everyone and their brother wants some D&D books.

Joann, one of our members, really wanted those books. Unfortunately, the books sold before she could make arrangements.

I was perusing the Goodwill on Harvey Street about two weeks later. I hadn’t found any noteworthy games in some time. The shelves were filled with dreck. I walked past one of the new merchandise bins. I found six, count ’em six, D&D books! And by some serendipity, the six books matched the titles I was asked to post on Facebook a couple of weeks earlier.

The clerk rang up the books at 80 cents a pop. $5.09 later, I had a budding collection of 1st edition Dungeons & Dragons books. I was only too happy to give them to Joann who missed out on the ones being sold on our Facebook page (which were $20 each).

Enchanted Forest

Enchanted Forest from Ravensburger
Enchanted Forest from Ravensburger

I keep finding copies of Enchanted Forest. I’m not complaining. People in our group who have kids clamor over it.

I believe I’ve found 4 copies in 2017. Two members, Holly and Jonathan, got copies to play with their families. I now have an additional copy available.

Snorta!

Snorta! from Out of the Box Games
Snorta! from Out of the Box Games

Snorta! is another great family game. The components are cute plastic animals and barns. The game play revolves around being the first to make an animal sound when a card is flipped.

I’ve found a couple copies of this in 2017 that were incomplete. To my dismay, I was not able to cobble together a complete copy with them either.

But I did recently find a bona fide complete copy. Keeping with tradition, I gave it to Holly. Her kids are going to be inundated with games if this pattern keeps up.

You’re Bluffing

You're Bluffing from Ravensburger
You’re Bluffing from Ravensburger

IfSnorta! is a good farm animal game for children then You’re Bluffing is the same for adults. You’re bluffing is farm animal auction game. You either auction off an animal and collect money or you make a blind bid against an opponent’s animal. The goal is to collect entire sets of animal so they are worth points.

I was first introduced to this game by long time member Bruce. I found a copy for myself at a thrift store copy several years ago. I loaned it to former member Charles who ended up moving to Maryland–taking You’re Bluffing with him.

Some of the cards
Some of the cards

I made a local trade to get another copy for my library. But a recent trip to one of the thrift stores on 29th Street yield some thrift store gold: a complete copy of this prized game!

Now I have an extra copy available. I believe it’s earmarked for Tasha. But if she passes on it, I’ll make it available to the general public.

Arab Israeli War

Arab-Israeli Wars from Avalon Hill
Arab-Israeli Wars from Avalon Hill

Finding Avalon Hill games at thrift stores is like grabbing the brass ring. There are two reasons for this. The first is AH games are generally good games that stand the test of time. The second is owners of AH games take care of their games so most thrift store finds will be complete.

I found a copy of Avalon Hill’s The Arab-Israeli Wars, complete and mostly unplayed. Some of the counters were unpunched. Some gamer must have bought a copy of this game hoping to find a game group with which to play it only to have it sit idle for years on his shelf. If this is the case, I have a local game group that you will want to join!

Dinosaurs of the Lost World

Dinosaurs of the Lost World from Avalon Hill
Dinosaurs of the Lost World from Avalon Hill

I’ve been wanting a copy of Dinosaurs of the Lost World from Avalon Hill for a while now. The game has two modes: family and strategy. The game has better components than most Avalon Hill games (AH was known for the quality of game play, not quality of components). And I’m a huge fan of Jurassic Park so the theme works for me.

But the price doesn’t.

Modular board of Dinosaurs of the Lost World
Modular board of Dinosaurs of the Lost World

The game goes for $70+ when you can even find a copy. I put it low on my priority list.

While making my rounds one afternoon, I saw a game with this familiar title on it. I thought, “No way! This is some similarly named game.”

But to my pleasant surprise, it was a complete copy of the Avalon Hill classic. The game is now a permanent edition to our library.

Other thrift store finds

Elude the dungeon keepers of Muskegon!
Parker Brothers’ Dungeon Dice

 

 

 

 

 

Ultimate Werewolf
Ultimate Werewolf

 

 

 

 

 

Stratego 4
Stratego 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where the thrifting never stops…

Muskegon Area Gamers

Muskegon, MI
188 Muskegon Area Gamers

This group is for anyone interested in playing board games, card games or any table top game. This group learns and teachs new games all the time. We welcome fresh players. We…

Next Meetup

Epic Games: Dune

Sunday, Aug 6, 2017, 11:00 AM
6 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

 

Around the world of board gaming July 2017

Lots of news to cover around the world of board gaming. We will talk about GenCon, game theory, the market outlook for Hasbro and, of course, The (New) Gaming Annex. Hope you enjoy it!

Around the World of Board Gaming July 2017

GenCon 4 day badges are sold out

GenCon logo
GenCon logo

What happens when 60,000 of your closest gaming buddies all sign up for GenCon? If you said, “GenCon sells out for the first time in its history”, you’d be correct. There are no more 4 day passes for 2017. The badges, which sell for $90, sold out this month.

This is the 50th anniversary of GenCon. To commemorate this, the officials at GenCon wanted to top all their previous attendance goals. They pulled out all the stops.

They Might Be Giants
They Might Be Giants

They even have a concert.

They Might Be Giants is playing at the stadium adjacent to GenCon. And GenCon goers have access to ticketing.

We should conclude that 4 day passes for next year’s GenCon will sell quickly; everyone who missed out this year will want to buy their badge early in 2018.

 

Hasbro is not a good buy

Hasbro
Hasbro

I rough up Hasbro a lot on this blog. But there is no denying that they make lots of money publishing toys and games. This is due to Hasbro’s strong performance in the market place and Mattel’s missteps.

But Hasbro reported their smallest sales in 1.5 years. This past quarter was not kind to the publisher-we-love-to-hate. Hasbro had to rely on Transformers: The Last Knight toys and Spider-Man: Homecoming action figures. And these two franchises were not up to the task. Hasbro gets 50% of its revenue from overseas. Sales in Brazil and the UK were lower than expected this quarter.

But there is no cause for long term concern. Hasbro has the rights to the new Star Wars movie, The Last Jedi. Hasbro is the publisher of choice for many Disney IP toys. Hasbro is also launching a board game delivery service this fall. So don’t panic. We will be able to use Hasbro as a punching bag for many years to come.

Game Theory in Geopolitics

North Korean military prowess
North Korean military prowess

The situation in the Korean peninsula is heating up. It’s not bad enough that the Korean War ended in 1953 with a stalemate. But 64 years later the situation is deteriorating.

The regime is run by the grandson of the dictator who precipitated the first conflict there. This new dictator, Kim Jong Un, seems insistent on demonstrating his ability to launch rockets against the US.

While this is a topic of importance, what we focus on here is gaming. And the strategists working for the defense of the USA are using game theory to flesh out a course of action. Game theory is about playing the player along with playing the game. The game here is geopolitics in the Korean peninsula. The players are North Korea, South Korea, China and the USA. And game theory assumes rational actors.

Along with NPR’s article on the subject, Project Syndicate has a good background on the subject here. The use of game theory in geopolitics is not new. The Kennedy’s used it to game out a scenario to “win” the Cuban Missile Crisis. Our current administration is doing the same with North Korea.

 

Close to Home

851 W. Laketon Avenue 49441 The Gaming Annex
The (New) Gaming Annex

So we moved.

Our new location is at 851 W. Laketon Avenue Suite A. This is near Henry Street in the city of Muskegon. The building is an office/retail site along with some industrial warehousing in the rear.

We moved from 1976 W. Sherman Boulevard due to a change in ownership in the strip mall we were renting. We were there just under five years. After a tearful goodbye, we have moved to some new digs. We had over 10 people in our group helping out moving, loading and even renting trucks to aid the move. I was overwhelmed. I’m very grateful for this gaming community.

Our new place is about 50% bigger than the old place. We now have 1,300 square feet, compared to about 800 before. We have three separate rooms which helps keep noise and distractions down. There are a two annoying things about the new place. The first is the air conditioning. The A/C is a work in process. I’m hoping that the climate will be under more control this Tuesday. The second is parking. Just ask Brandi.

Muskegon Watch Us Go
Muskegon Watch Us Go

I’m confident we can work out these bugs. I’m hopeful this new location will work out long term. The location should be conducive to recruiting too. Lots of foot traffic. And Rick Jima, one of our misanthropes, is working on getting a new $20 awning. Expect big things!

 

Byte Club Gaming of North Muskegon
Byte Club Gaming of North Muskegon

Speaking of new locations, our former partners, Byte Club Gaming, moved. Abruptly. Like, no fanfare or anything.

Byte Club Gaming of North Muskegon is now Byte Club Gaming of Pentwater. Per their facebook and website, they are offering the same services as before, just in northern Oceana County.

We wish them the best of luck in their new location. Their new location will put them outside the scope of the Muskegon Area Gamers. But with little luck and a lot of hard work, they turn that resort town into a thriving gaming community.

Extra Life logo
Extra Life logo

I guess that makes more room for Griffin’s Rest. Speaking of which, I had the pleasure of meeting with Kiel and his partner, Dan, this month. We discussed our plans for this November’s Extra Life event. Griffin’s Rest will be having an event at their two story retail outlet on 3rd Street.

Kiel said final preparations for his store are under way. He should be open in August.

And we will be there to support!

 

To follow local news, check us out here:

 

Bring out your DM’s!

[Editor’s note: it’s time for another installment of Just in Tima with Nick Sima]

Bring out your DM’s!

 

Gloomhaven, Descent, Star Wars Imperial Assault, Zombicide… What do all of these games have in common? They’re board game versions of a tabletop RPG that miss the mark slightly. I recently received a copy of Dungeons and Dragons Fifth Edition Starter set so that I could run a small campaign with some friends. While I was reading up on how to run the first dungeon they scope out, I noticed a couple of tips for Dungeon Masters that linked up perfectly with a discussion Chris and I had months ago.

Gloomhaven from Cephalofair Games
Gloomhaven from Cephalofair Games

The thing that Tabletop RPG board games like Gloomhaven and Zombicide is missing is a Dungeon Master. The thing that Star Wars: Imperial Assault and Descent is missing, oddly enough, is a Dungeon Master. Sure, you’ll say that Descent has a player acting as the bad guys, but that’s not what a Dungeon Master does entirely.

The missed point in Gloomhaven is so egregious that one of our intrepid members fired the game from just one room. A really simple AI works in theory, but sooner or later a room will be encountered where it’s a logistical nightmare just to figure out what enemy does what. Balancing the checkbook has never been fun, doing it for which zombie decides to punt you over the mountains is unbearable. Zombicide masks this by just choosing yes in all columns for where zombies go. It’s ridiculous, but it’s still more tedious than is ‘good’

Star Wars Imperial Assault will hit the gaming table a lot in Muskegon
Star Wars Imperial Assault

Let’s go back to Descent and Star Wars: Imperial Assault, they both have a player operating the bad dudes. That’s good, right? Well, not really. The player running the bad guys and the players playing their hero have diametrically opposed goals. I played as the overlord in Descent for a while. I won some long odds fights from good card play and luck. This made me stronger which made it easier for me to win against my friends more and more. I got stronger and stronger and they had less and less fun. Talking with our resident GM/DM Kevin, he shared a similar experience in Star Wars: Imperial Assault. The GM having an opposite goal and benefitting from winning leads to 3-4 players having a bad time more often than not.

Muskegon loves Dungeons & Dragons
Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition

So, what do these games need to be better? I think we need a GM that wins when the players win. Chris and I discussed some viable options where the two victory conditions could be met independently such as the GM needing only to save one bad guy from a fight while the heroes running around need to loot all the treasure. It could also just as easily be set up where every time the heroes level up, the GM also gets a couple new toys. Is it more a simulation or activity than a board game at that point? Yeah, probably. Would it be more fun? Hard telling, I’ll need a big named board game developer to make it so I can find out.

 

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Tabletop Games in Pop Culture

Our hobby has been going more mainstream. Designer games are available at national department stores. Game manufacturers have considerable clout in the financial sector. But when pop culture begins to use board games, you know our hobby isn’t just about how and where we spend our money. Here’s a look at some examples of how board games have permeated into pop culture.

 

Tabletop Games in Pop Culture

 

The Handmaid’s Tale (Scrabble)

The Handmaiden's Tale Muskegon Area Gamers
The Handmaid’s Tale

Scrabble has been around forever. It was first published in 1938 as a multi-player crossword game. It would later be sold to the Long Island distributor Selchow-Righter who made the game a household name. Due to its near ubiquity, it seems obvious that Scrabble would break into the mainstream pop culture. Recently, the game made for a tense scene in the miniseries The Handmaid’s Tale.

Hulu’s original show The Handmaid’s Tale has been a critical success. It’s garnered a rating of 8.7 on IMDB and a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Not too shabby for the upstart competitor of cable TV and Netflix. The show is a gripping, dystopian tale with excellent performances–especially by the talented Elisabeth Moss. While I recommend the show, what we are more interested here is tabletop games.

The Commander, played by Joseph Fiennes, decides to break the ice with his handmaid Offred, played by Moss. The Commander breaks out a copy of Scrabble. The two play a game where Offred lets the Commander win, unbeknownst to him. Their game comes off as polite but also white-knuckled–a great feat for such a dry game.

The Handmaid's Tale Scrabble
The Handmaid’s Tale Scrabble

But It seems that Scrabble connoisseurs were not too keen on how the rules for Scrabble were not followed. Although they played Scrabble, it felt more like Words with Friends. The final score was a whopping 386 to 383. The Commander’s challenge fail but he did not lose a turn. And the two players spelled words like zygote and larynx.

 

Monopoly (Carol Burnett and The Sopranos)

Carol Burnett and Friends play Monopoly
Carol Burnett and Friends play Monopoly

Monopoly has been a part of pop culture for a couple of generations now. Classic television viewers will remember the Carol Burnett and Friends skits dealing with Mama’s Family. (It spawned a lengthy spinoff by the same name). Burnett played the tragic white trash Eunice, daughter of Mama (Vicki Lawrence) and Daddy (Harvey Korman). In one skit, Eunice’s exuberance in finally getting Boardwalk and Park Place is quickly and hysterically dashed when she lands on her mama’s hotel on St. Charles Place and her dad’s hotel on Kentucky Avenue on her next two moves.

The Sopranos play Monopoly
The Sopranos play Monopoly

The best pop culture reference of Monopoly is probably the Sopranos, however. Tony, Carmela, Bobby and Janice play a family game of the Parker Brothers’ classic. But the “family” in question is the Soprano clan. And any game with this family is liable to end in bloodshed.

What is interesting about The Sopranos’ Monopoly scene is the discussion about the rules. Bobby asks why Tony is putting cash in the center of the board instead of the bank. Carmela explains they play with the Free Parking rule: whoever lands on Free Parking gets all that money. Carmela offers the explanation, “It adds a whole level of excitement to the game”. Bobby is a rules purist. He grabs the rules and demands to be shown where this rule is located. Carmela says it’s not an official rule but is a widely accepted variant.

When Tony lands on Free Parking, Bobby laments that the Parker Brothers spent a lot of time making a strategy game only to have the Sopranos devolve it into a game of chance.

And then the bloodshed.

Tony Soprano with a Monopoly house
Tony Soprano with a Monopoly house

Tony quips at Janice’s expense. Tony makes cracks about her bouts with mental illness and her past promiscuity. Bobby suffers enough indignation about these comments at his wife’s expense and a brawl ensues. When the brawl is over, Tony is dripping with blood. Carmela has to pluck a Monopoly house out of his cheek. And you know the old adage: the only way to win Monopoly is to not play.

 

Risk (Seinfeld)

Kramer carrying Risk board
Kramer carrying Risk board

Given the chops that Risk has offered to wargamers over the years, one should expect Risk to be represented in pop culture. 90’s radio staple R.E.M. had a pop song called, “Man on the Moon” featuring the lyrics “let’s play Twister, let’s play Risk”.

One of the most memorable pop references of the  Parker Brothers classic would have to be Seinfeld. The Show about Nothing had an episode where Kramer and Newman played a days long game of Risk. To keep the game safe from each other, Kramer and Newman had to move the board to neutral territory–which means Jerry Seinfeld’s apartment.

Kramer and Newman struggle for global domination
Kramer and Newman struggle for global domination

Kramer and Newman later can be seen playing their game on the subway. Kramer goads Newman as Kramer’s grasp on world domination is at hand. “I have a stronghold in Greenland. I’ve driven you out of Western Europe”.
Newman retorts that he has a good hold of the Ukraine. Kramer dismisses this and says the Ukraine is weak. A Ukrainian man is riding on the subway next to them and overhears this part of their conversation. The Ukrainian stranger transforms into a charging Cossack and ransacks Kramer’s game, pieces flying all over the subway.

 

 

Strange Things (D&D)

Netflix's Stranger Things
Netflix’s Stranger Things

Netflix’s original series, “Stranger Things” was written with me in mind:

1. Its protagonists are kids from the 80’s

2. It’s science fiction/fantasy

3. The protagonists play Dungeons & Dragons.

Needless to say, I highly recommend the show. I’m waiting with bated breath for season two, slated for an October release.

Kids in Stranger Things playing D&D
Kids in Stranger Things playing D&D

What we will be looking at here is Dungeons & Dragons angle.  In the opening scene of the show, four kids are seen in a basement playing D&D. Mike is the DM. He has a screen up. He is flinging troglodytes at the wizard, knight and dwarf. The players (PC’s) are deftly cutting through the trogs,

Will the Wise Wizard faces off against Demogorgon
Will the Wise Wizard faces off against Demogorgon

The PC’s suspect Demogorgon is near. For the uninitiated, Demogorgon is a two-headed demon prince. He has impressive stats.  The episode doesn’t explain why the players would know this. But their intuition proves correct when the Prince of Demons sprouts from the darkness.

D&D Expert book
D&D Expert book

The scene works as foreshadowing for the series as a whole. But game purists will quibble over a few flaws. Mike has a copy of Dungeons & Dragons the Expert edition. But Demogorgon is only found in Advanced Dungeons & Dragon’s Monster Manual. Indeed, all the demons and devils are in AD&D and AD&D only. The basic edition was the more suitable for those sticking their toes into RPG’s. The reason for this discrepancy? I would guess this inconsistency was caused by someone in the show’s production team who was a non-gamer; someone who easily conflated “D&D Expert edition” with “Advanced Dungeons & Dragons”.

 

A convocation of board games and pop culture…

Muskegon Area Gamers

Muskegon, MI
179 Muskegon Area Gamers

This group is for anyone interested in playing board games, card games or any table top game. This group learns and teachs new games all the time. We welcome fresh players. We…

Next Meetup

Twilight Imperium

Sunday, Jun 11, 2017, 9:00 AM
4 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

 

 

 

 

SeaFall Session 1

Here is our 2nd installment from www.iggygames.com. This one is about our first full session of SeaFall. SPOILER ALERT!

 

SeaFall Session 1

 

 

Muskegon Area Gamers SeaFall
SeaFall game board

My SeaFall group gets together on Thursdays to play. With this Thursday being Thanksgiving, we got together on Wednesday to play the first game. It was a good game, in my opinion, however, I didn’t notice until after that I set the board up wrong, not adding all the millstone cards to the board, and thus we were not able to unlock the first box. While we wouldn’t have met that condition anyway, we may have played differently to unlock it. We also would have met other milestones and the game would have moved faster. As it was, it took us just under 2 1/2 hours to get game 1 played, this was also due to the times we had to look things up in the rule book. I’m sure by game 3 we won’t need to do this as often.


Ingrid Eld

We all needed to pick a new leader as at the end of the prolog you needed to rip up your SeaFall - Game 1leader. My new leader, Ingrid is keeping with the Norse theme, means Beautiful Goddess. My special ability is that for 2 coins, I can take all three merchant’s guild actions. Not once did this come in handy for me during the first game, it may help in later, but I may try and replace it as soon as I can. I’m not fully sure how I’m going to play Ingrid yet.

I played the first game mostly as a merchant. Bought and either traded the resources for cheaper buildings or sold them for gold. I tried one raid, and 1 explorer action, and failed on both. I think my notes may be messed up as I only sank once during this game, so I’m not sure how I failed both.


Outcome

Brian

  • Buildings
    • Port
    • Market
    • Gun tower
  • Upgrades
  • Raids = 1
    • Failed Raids = 1
  • Explorations = 1
    • Failed Explorations = 1
  • Ships Sunk = 1
    • Total Damage taken = 3
Tasha

  • Buildings
  • Upgrades
  • Raids = 4
    • Failed Raids = 1
  • Explorations = 1
    • Failed Explorations = 0
  • Ships Sunk = 1
    • Total Damage taken = 3

Chris

  • Buildings
    • Observatory
    • Gun tower
  • Upgrades
    • Intrepid
  • Raids = 0
    • Failed Raids = 0
  • Explorations = 2
    • Failed Explorations = 1
  • Ships Sunk = 1
    • Total Damage taken = 6
Brandi

  • Buildings
    • Port
  • Upgrades
  • Raids = 0
    • Failed Raids = 0
  • Explorations = 5
    • Failed Explorations = 1
  • Ships Sunk = 1
    • Total Damage taken = 10

Final Score

SeaFall - Game 1I didn’t keep track of how many treasures people bought, I know there were some 2 pointers bought in the game, and I know that helped Brandi win the game, again.

Brandi = 11pts
Tasha = 9pts
Brian = 7pts
Chris = 4pts

Brandi being the winner was able to upgrade her province, taking a new Appellation, then we were all able to upgrade 1 ship ability, and 1 of the advisers.


Final thoughts on Game 1

SeaFall - Game 1I really wish I would have set the board up correctly and had the milestones in, but it is what it is, and it didn’t mess us up too badly. I would have made the game much faster, however, and we may have been able to get in another game.

All in all, I think we all enjoyed the game. Chris and Tasha think they may know what the ‘mystery’ of the game is, and man do I hope they are wrong. If it does come out to that, I will probably give the overall game a rating of 1, no matter how much I enjoyed it.

Here is to the next game, and hopefully unlocking the first box this time!